Music is neurologically special in the way that it stimulates many parts of the brain at once. This means that even if parts of the brain are damaged, music can still reach other parts.

Playlist for Life has now launched at St Andrew’s Hospice!

More than 20 years of research shows that listening to a personal playlist can make living with dementia easier and happier. By choosing songs and music that have an attachment to memories and emotions, it can enhance your life.

St Andrew’s Hospice are looking to show you that having a unique and personal playlist, that connects to you and your family’s life, will help you cope with any life-limiting illness. Playlist for Life can also be used for respite, day-to-day routine, relaxation or anxiety prevention.

If the word “playlist” makes you think that it’s all technical and puts you off, never fear. We are recruiting the help of students from local colleges and people who study music to help anybody who doesn’t know where to start with it. You can make a playlist on phones, computers, CD players, iPods, MP3 players – it doesn’t even have to be individual songs, it could be a collection of CD’s, vinyl records, tapes, videos, sheet music – whatever way you want to make your playlist, you can do it.

Our team have an easy start guide for you to follow and find a few select songs or albums that are special to you and from there our Well-being Team can help you to set up your very own Playlist For Life! They are on hand to help anybody at our weekly Coffee Mornings from 10am until 12pm, within the main hub of the hospice. Anyone is welcome to these Drop-In Support session's and it's always lovely to see new faces.

If you don't know where to start, don't worry, our team have created booklets from each decade from the Playlist For Life 100 Years Book, which is full of songs for you to begin looking for songs that mean a lot to you. www.playlistforlife.org.uk/100-years-book

Music is neurologically special in the way that it stimulates many parts of the brain at once. This means that even if parts of the brain are damaged, music can still reach other parts. Playlist for Life promotes the use of therapeutic scheduling – i.e. timing listening sessions for thirty minutes before difficult times or activities such as the taking of medication.

Along with the Playlist for Life, we are also asking for people to donate old iPods, CD players, MP3 players, or anything that you can play music on to help the people that will benefit from these playlists.

As well as bringing back old memories, it can be a way for you to bond and find music that you love together. It could be that you share the first song you danced to at your wedding with your granddaughter or you could share the song that you listened to when you got your first record with your son, it’s a way of bringing everyone together through music and song.

The first Playlist For Life at St Andrew's Hospice has been started by Brian and Dawn. Dawn is suffering from dementia and Brian has put together a selection of songs chosen from the 1960s through to the present day. Brian spent hours looking through the Top 10 Hits of each year online and then looked through their own music collection to carefully pick out songs that meant a lot to them both. Now, with the help of our Well-being Team, they plan to create a CD that can be played at home, in the car or at appointments.

www.playlistforlife.org.uk

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